Takeshi Enomoto of the Integrated Modeling Research Program received the Yamamoto-Syono Award for Outstanding Papers from the Meteorological Society of Japan


Takeshi Enomoto of the Integrated Modeling Research Program, Frontier Research System for Global Change, received the Yamamoto-Syono Award for Outstanding Papers from the Meteorological Society of Japan. It is awarded every year to one or two recently published papers by young scientists below thirty-five years old. The title of the winning paper is "The formation mechanism on the Bonin high in August" appeared in the January 2003 issue of Quarterly Journal of Royal Meteorological Society.

Takeshi Enomoto Receives the Yamamoto-Syono Award for Outstanding Papers at the 2003 Fall Meeting of Meteorological Society of Japan

Enomoto wrote the manuscript at Frontier Research System for Global Change based on his doctoral dissertation. He attempted to explain the formation mechanism of the ridge that covers Japan in the late summer. Although the jet stream in general weakens in summer, its portion over the Eurasian continent, called the Asian jet, is intensified by the Tibetan anticyclone. In August, stationary Rossby waves propagate along the Asian jet from Middle to Far East. Enomoto named after this wavetrain "the Silk Road pattern" and hypothesized that accumulation of wave energy may create the ridge over Japan. His numerical experiments clearly showed that radiative cooling over the east Mediterranean and Aral seas that act as wave forcing is responsible for the ridge near Japan rather than the heating in the Western Pacific that has traditionally been suspected to influence the late summer climate near Japan.

"This paper alone does not provide the whole picture of such a complex system as the Asian summer monsoon. With global high-resolution simulations on the Earth Simulator as a powerful tool, I would like to explore the Monsoon system in depth." says Enomoto.